Shellbark Hickory

  

(Carya laciniosa)

shellbark hickory
© Mike Smith, all rights reserved
shellbark hickory
© Mike Smith, all rights reserved
shellbark hickory buds
© Joe Dziewa, some rights reserved (CC-BY-NC)

The shellbark hickory is rare is Canada and possibly introduced through plantings by native Americans. It Looks similar to the more common shagbark hickoy with a straight, prominent leader, shaggy bark, and compound leaves. The main difference between the shagbark and shellbark hickory is the larger nuts, leaves, and overall size on the shellbark hickory.

A light annual crop of nuts appear after 10 - 12 years of age. Nuts are edible and similar to pecans in taste. They are the largest of all hickories and are consumed by various wildlife such as deer, bears, foxes, rabbits, and turkey.

References:

Arbor Day Foundation, (n.d.). Shellbark Hickory Carya laciniosa. Retrieved from https://www.arborday.org/trees/treeguide/TreeDetail.cfm?ItemID=850

The Arboretum - University of Guelph, (n.d ). Shellbark Hickory - Carya laciniosa. Retrieved from https://www.uoguelph.ca/arboretum/thingstosee/trees/balsamfirshellbarkhickory

Sheereen Othman, (2016). Shellbark Hickory: The Grandest of them all. Retrieved from https://arbordayblog.org/treeoftheweek/shellbark-hickory/

Ontario Trees & Shrubs (n.d.). Shellbark hickory Carya laciniosa. Retrieved from http://ontariotrees.com/main/species.php?id=2046

Trees of Canada - Tree Canada, (n.d.). Shellbark hickory (Carya laciniosa). Retrieved from https://treecanada.ca/resources/trees-of-canada/shellbark-hickory-carya-laciniosa/